U S AIR RACE INFORMATION
CROSS COUNTRY AIR RACING

The Competition
A cross country air race is a test of all pilot skills in the real world of flying. The goal is to fly the designated course in the fastest time. Races are precisely timed. Aircraft are handicapped equalizing them. Special divisions provide for non handicapped planes of the same type, model or horsepower. Turbo/supercharged engines fly in separate divisions. Flying is daylight VFR only.

The Race Course
Race routes are selected from locations across the North American continent. An effort is made to have each racing event in an entirely new location. Long events range from 1800-2400 miles and are broken into legs to allow for refueling and overnight stays. Short, one day events are 200-300 mile non-stop round robin formats.

The Aircraft
Any piston powered aircraft with sufficient range to fly at full power between designated fueling stops (300sm). Aircraft must carry a certificate of airworthiness and proof of annual inspection.

The Pilot
Participation is open to all current licensed pilots.

The Crew
In addition to the licensed pilot one crew is required. This person may or may not be a licensed pilot. The aircraft may be occupied by as many people as the seats/load will allow. Planes are handicapped with the weight they will carry during a race.

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